Increasing Your Intake of Positive News for a Better Wellbeing

Author : Alex Crump

News-related stress is a real thing! Reading more positive news can help to combat the effects.

Studies have shown that daily news consumption can cause regular and increased worry, particularly during and following the pandemic. News sources highlight negative stories rather than positive ones to increase clickbait and engagement, including television, social media and newspapers. Sometimes, watching the news can be necessary to keep up to date with any national broadcasts, for example, the frequently changing advice during the pandemic. However, seeking out positive news can be a beneficial way to reduce the news-related stress caused by daily news coverage.

Here are a few various ways you can increase your intake of positive news daily:

1.  The Happy Newspaper

The Happy Newspaper is a company set up in 2015 to provide a physical newspaper that exclusively features positive news stories from three months between each issue.

As well as the physical newspaper, which you can subscribe to receive, The Happy Newspaper has an Instagram page where they frequently post the top recent positive stories and positive quotes and images.

They also have an ‘Everyday Heroes’ feature where you can nominate a person, group or organisation who has done something positive that you think should be shared.

2.  Some Good News

Some Good News originally started on YouTube during the pandemic as a show hosted by John Krasinski to promote positive news across the internet. Including widely shared stories as well as local, lesser-known stories, showing that positivity is everywhere.

The show has since transferred over to social media platforms Instagram and Twitter, with stories ranging from people shaving their heads for someone recently diagnosed with cancer to an older person reacting to a homemade birthday cake made by their neighbour. No story is too big or small.

3.  Positive.News 

Positive.News is a physical and digital magazine featuring positive news stories worldwide. They highlight uplifting news articles on various topics, including society, environment, science and many more.

The magazine and website have a featured page dedicated to positive environmental news. With articles including the positive impact we can have, and some have already had, on slowing down climate change. Showing us that the smallest act can make a big difference. A great way to feel inspired and proactive!

4.  BBC News App

 The BBC News app is a hub for any news articles from around the world. Within the BBC news app, you can add preferred topics to the ‘My News’ tab to personalise your reading, including various subjects like entertainment, science, technology and more.

This feature will allow you to keep up with important news while breaking it up with positivity to ensure you are taking a break from the many negative news stories that populate the ‘Top Stories’ tab.

Daily news intake, particularly negative articles, can be berating on your mental health therefore; it is just as essential to keep up with positive news.

Encourage more optimism in your daily life and reduce the effects of news-related stress today!

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Get in contact today with Each Person to find out how to provide employees with the ultimate ‘feel good’ package, including a wide range of rewards, such as gift vouchers, products with great cashback, personalised Ecards, and wellbeing & financial support. Email us at [email protected], to find out more.

Sources:

  1. ‘The Mental Health Impact of Daily News Exposure During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Ecological Momentary Assessment Study’, JMIR Publications – https://mental.jmir.org/2022/5/e36966/
  2. ‘Media overload is hurting our mental health. Here are ways to manage headline stress’, American Psychological Association – https://www.apa.org/monitor/2022/11/strain-media-overload