72% have not asked for a pay rise in last three years

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Almost three-quarters (72%) of respondents have not asked for a pay rise in the last three years, according to research by recruitment consultancy Randstad.

Its survey of 2,000 UK employees also found that around a third (34%) of respondents would consider asking their current boss for a pay increase.

The research also found:

  • 35% of respondents do not ask for a pay rise because they are worried that they will be turned down, 34% decline to do so out of fear of their managerā€™s reaction, and 29% cite the prospect of having to justify why they deserve an increase as the reason for not asking for a pay rise.
  • 72% of female respondents would never consider asking for a pay rise, compared to 58% of male respondents.
  • 44% of female respondents name fear of rejection as the primary reason for not asking for a pay rise, and male respondents citeĀ concern about how theirĀ manager will react (26%) as the main reason.
  • 14% of respondents aged 18-24 years old have asked for at least three pay rises in the last three years.
  • More than a third (34%) of London-based respondents have asked for a pay rise in the last three years.
  • 80% of respondents in the East Midlands and in East Anglia have not asked for a pay rise in the past three years.
  • 12% of respondents in North East England have asked for a pay rise three or more times in the last three years.

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Mark Bull, UK chief executive officer at Randstad, said: ā€œDespite signs pointing to a shortage of professional skills in certain sectors, UK employees still arenā€™t taking advantage of the increasingly open employment market.

ā€œWith nearly three-quarters not pushing for more money, and with explanations ranging from fear of rejection to jeopardising their current roles, questions should be raised about whether UK employers are creating the right working environment for their employees to stay and seek progression.ā€