44% view a good benefits package as an important quality in a prospective employer

paul-devoy

More than four in 10 (44%) respondents cite a good benefits package as one of the most important qualities they look for in a new employer, according to research by Investors in People.

Its Jobs exodus trends: 2017 employee sentiment poll, which surveyed 1,028 employees and 1,002 unemployed adults seeking work in the UK, also found that 67% of respondents view competitive pay as a key quality in a prospective employer, and 42% seek an organisation that has a reputation as a good employer.

The research also found:

  • 38% of respondents aged between 16 and 29 years old claim that being part of an organisation that values its staff is one of the most important qualities they look for in a new employer.
  • 36% of respondents would prefer a more flexible approach to working hours over a 3% pay rise.
  • 51% of respondents are looking to move jobs because¬†they think they can earn more money elsewhere.
  • 47% of respondents admit that a small pay rise¬†is the one thing their employer could do to increase happiness in their job.
  • 15% of respondents cite a lack of benefits as the main reason why they are not happy in their jobs, 44% list¬†pay as the key reason, and¬†34% name¬†feeling undervalued at work as the main reason they are unhappy in their job.
  • 47% of female respondents cite¬†a good team as the aspect they like most about their current job, followed by enjoyable work (43%), flexible working (38%), and pay (36%).
  • 45% of male respondents list pay as the factor they like most about their current job, followed by enjoyable work (42%), a good team (34%), and flexible working (30%).

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Paul Devoy (pictured), head at Investors in People, said: “This year we were expecting to see British [employees] planning to stay put in the face of economic uncertainty. But we’ve seen exactly the opposite; a significant rise in people looking to move jobs in 2017, backed by a rise in confidence in the jobs market.

‚Äú[Employees] are telling us they want to move for better management, better pay and flexible working. This sends a clear message to British business to invest in their people or 2017 might be the year they move on.‚ÄĚ